Lynda Hinton, CRS, GRI, Managing Broker Windermere Real Estate/Whatcom, Inc.
Windermere Real Estate Whatcom
Lynda Hinton :: 360.303.1023 :: Lynda@lyndahinton.com

Whatcom County

 

 
 
What an incredible place to live! Whether you are looking to be in the heart of Fairhaven or nestled in the county on acreage, Whatcom County offers many different styles of living.  The beauty of our area is unmatched from breathtaking vistas of the San Juan islands to spectacular views of Mt. Baker!  

Contact me and I can help you find the perfect area to live in and call "home"!
 
Photo by John Brunk
 
Whatcom County is home to Mount Baker, the highest peak in the North Cascade mountain range (10,778 feet) which is renown for its skiing.  Whatcom County borders British Columbia, Canada to the north, Skagit County to the south, Okanogan County to the east and the Strait of Georgia to the west. Much of the county is mountainous and surrounded by water (Lake Whatcom, Lake Samish and the Pacific Ocean).  The County is full of parks to visit and trails to explore.  This is an awesome place to live for the outdoor enthusiast!



Below is a list of Bellingham communities and outlying towns in Whatcom County:

     Bellingham    
           Fairhaven/Edgemoor 
           Geneva/Sudden Valley 
           Southside 
           Silver Beach/ Northshore 
           Columbia 
      Birch Bay
      Blaine
      Everson/Nooksack
      Ferndale
      Lynden
      Lummi Island
      Mt. Baker Corridor
      Point Roberts
      Sumas

Information:
Whatcom County

Bellingham
Located on Bellingham Bay with Mt. Baker as its backdrop, Bellingham is the last major city before the Washington coastline meets the Canadian border. Bellingham is 85 miles north of Seattle and an hour south of Vancouver, B.C. Transportation links connect the community to the nearby San Juan Islands and Victoria on Vancouver Island. 

Bellingham has an active waterfront port that supports fishing, boat building, shipping and marina operations. Squalicum Harbor is the second largest in Puget Sound, with 1,900 pleasure and commercial boats moored. From Bellingham's ports, passenger ferries leave for whale watch cruises, tours to Victoria on Vancouver Island and cruises to the San Juan Island.

The downtown area has a mixture of restaurants, art galleries and specialty shops. Spend the day in Bellingham's renowned district's Victorian-era buildings. Here you can find shops offering hand-crafted products, local restaurants that serve fresh seafood plus art galleries featuring Northwest artisans. The cultural district includes the respected Whatcom Museum of History and Art. Originally built in 1892 as city hall, the museum's imposing brick building is the centerpiece of a four-building campus, including a children's museum.

Bellingham is home to Western Washington University on Sehome Hill, from which you have a sweeping view across the bay to the San Juan Islands. 

Information:
City of Bellingham
Bellingham School District 
Bellingham Herald
Port of Bellingham


Birch Bay
There are families from Washington State and Canada who have summered in Birch Bay for generations. Located on a shallow, crescent shaped bay, this beachside community offers a range of year-round recreation for families or couples looking for a get-away from the hustle and bustle of big towns.

Activities include five challenging golf courses, a waterslide park, go-carts, bingo, bike riding, horseback riding and sandcastle building.

For the bird watchers, Birch Bay and nearby Blaine are a birders paradise." Birch Bay State Park and nearby Blaines Marine Park and Drayton Harbor are among the top birding spots on the Washington State Birding Trails Cascade Loop. This area boasts the largest heron rookery as well as a huge number of water fowl and shorebirds in the spring, fall and winter months. Along Birch Bay Drive are a number of spots for catching glimpses of nesting eagles.

A full service resort community, there's a range of lodging and camping options. Slow down and revitalize yourself in Birch Bay.

Information:
Birch Bay Chamber 


Blaine
Friendly and unpretentious, Blaine is located on the Canadian border and is virtually surrounded by water. Just 35 miles from Vancouver, this casual community packs a lot of attractions and activities for just 3,000 residents.

Beautifully framed by Mt. Baker to the east and Semiahmoo Bay and Georgia Strait to the west, it is the busiest border crossing point, known as the Peace Arch, between B.C. and Washington.

Located on the Semiahmoo Spit is Semiahmoo Resort. This world-class resort features a marina, pool, spa, fitness center, restaurants and championship golf courses. Semiahmoo Spit is also home to Semiahmoo Park, which features more than 300 acres of tideland and approximately 1.5 miles of level pathways ideal for such outdoor adventures as walking, biking, rollerblading, kayaking, clamming, sand sculpting, kite flying and picnicking. A historic seasonal ferry called the Plover shuttles passengers between Semiahmoo and the downtown area of Blaine.

Blaine and nearby Birch Bay are gaining an international reputation as a birding haven. The tide pools, estuaries and waterways attract thousands of geese, ducks, gulls, loons and shorebirds each year and recently made the Audubon Societys list as one of the states top birding destinations. Popular Drayton Harbor attracts a high population of loons as well as endangered species such as the bald eagle, peregrine falcon and marbled murrelet.

Information:
City of Blaine
Blaine School District


Everson/Nooksack
Located in the fertile Nooksack Valley, these sister cities are located on State Highways 544 and 9 along the Nooksack River. With a combined population under 3,000, these low-key rural communities are a major part of the region's agricultural heritage. Berries, dairy cattle, carrots, potatoes and a variety of specialty produce are raised in the fields surrounding these small communities. In fact, some of the farms are open during season for people to buy fresh produce and products.
To enjoy the spirit of these two communities, visit in July when they stage the annual Everson - Nooksack Summer Festival. Activities include a pancake breakfast, softball tournament, parade, childrens games and local entertainment.

Information:
Everson/Nooksack Chamber of Commerce
Just North of Bellingham about a dozen miles is Ferndale. Located on the Nooksack River, Ferndale was founded in the mid-1800s and was first called Jam because of a big jam of logs that clogged the river. The town has grown from its humble beginnings, but history and heritage lives on in this community of 9,000 people. 

Hovander Homestead Park
and Pioneer Park are two great examples of the rural homesteading and farm life of the Mt. Baker region. Hovander Homestead Park is a turn of the century farm county park, with a Victorian home that is listed on the National Historic Register. The park is host to the Scottish Highland Games, an Antique Farm Fair and Civil War Reenactment each summer. A short stroll away is the Tennant Lake Interpretive Center, a sprawling facility that interprets the marsh and lakeside wildlife of the region. Don't miss the fragrance garden, a raised garden filled with aromatic herbs and plants with wheelchair access and Braille for the visually impaired. A sturdy boardwalk takes visitors through marshlands and around Tennant Lake, with interpretive stations to identify the plants and wildlife.  

Near downtown is Pioneer Park. This wooded setting is home to one of the finest collections of original pioneer log cabins in the Northwest. These eleven log cabins, built by the early pioneers of the region, sat alone in the early forests and rough clearings. To save them from destruction, they were moved to Ferndale from various locations to this site next to the Nooksack River. The public may view and tour these historic buildings in a village setting. These buildings and cabins are over 100 years old and illustrate vividly the strength and determination of the pioneer settlers, who carved a new life in the West.

Since 1897, the Pioneer Park has hosted the Old Settlers Picnic each August. This down-home festival celebrates the past with parades, carnival, performances and hearty food. The park also features the Olde Fashioned Christmas celebration during the first week in December, when the cabins are decorated to replicate how early pioneers celebrated the holiday.

Information:
Ferndale Chamber of Commerce
Ferndale School District


Lynden
Lynden is home to Washington State's largest Dutch settlement and is the heart of the region's farmland. Upon reaching the four-block span of Front Street, known as Dutch Old Town, visitors are greeted by a 72-foot tall working windmill connected to Dutch Village Mall, which features eighteen shops specializing in Dutch lace, wooden shoes, delftware and other imports. Waitresses in restaurants bustle about in native dress as they serve tasty Dutch meals with a warm smile and friendly service.

Nearby, the Lynden Pioneer Museum gives a glimpse of the "simpler" life in the earlier days of this farming community. The museum features one of the largest collections of antique buggies in the U.S. plus a two-story replica of Lynden at the turn of the last century.

This is also a village that loves to celebrate life's simpler things. Throughout the year the community rolls out the red carpet with authentic festivals and events that showcases their heritage. The granddaddy celebration of them all is the Northwest Washington Fair each August. Rated one of the cleanest fairs in the state, you'll enjoy animal displays, home grown arts, food stalls plus top name entertainers.

Everywhere you turn, you'll get the feeling that this quaint village truly appreciates your visit.

Information:
Lummi Island is a one of the best-kept secrets of the San Juan archipelago. Considerably more accessible than other islands, this pristine, rural gem is less than twenty minutes from Bellingham and a mere 6 minutes by the Whatcom Chief ferry. This half mountainous, half rural island is a peaceful, unspoiled getaway with tranquil beaches and 18 miles of country roads ideal for bike riding, walking or bird watching. Since there are no RV parks, campsites or state parks, the island attracts a different kind of holiday seeker.

The Island waters are popular for kayaking and Orca whales are often seen close to shore. Lummi Island is home to many artists and artisans who hold an Artist's Tour open house three times each year (Memorial Day, Labor Day, and the first weekend in December).

The Island also hosts a summer farmer's market, open Saturday mornings from May through September and within walking distance of the ferry. The market is an excellent source for both live crab & prawns plus organically grown fresh produce.

Just because this rural island is undeveloped does not mean there are no services. There are espresso shops; a country store; two full service restaurants - The Willows Inn Restaurant featuring organic fine dining with a spectacular San Juan Islands view, and the Beach Store Café, a fine little country bistro; a well appointed public library, post office, a charming country church and comfortable lodging including beachside rentals and bed and breakfasts.

Information:
Lummi Island 


Mt. Baker Corridor
From Bellingham to the majestic peak of Mt. Baker, State Route 542 offers visitors a step back in time. It's an unpretentious route, winding through farmlands, rolling wooded hills, and small communities. As the two-lane road climbs, the scenery grows in splendor and the air is crisper. After driving the final miles in hair-pin curves, the stunning views of the North Cascades unfold in a breathtaking snow peaked glory, you see Mt. Shuksan reflected in Mirror Lake.  This is probably the most photographed mountain scene in the Western hemisphere.  For the avid skier, this is where heaven begins. Mt. Baker Ski Resort offers skiers and snowboarders some of the finest terrain and the best snow conditions in the west. When other resorts are begging for snow, we are rolling in it, with the longest ski season in Washington. The Baker Shuttle runs every weekend plus bonus days during the ski season. For details on all snow activities check our downloadable Snow Sports fact sheet.

Try these mile-by-mile map pages for more information:
I-5 to milepost 9, milepost 10-21, milepost 22-40, milepost 41-end of highway.

Information:
Mt. Baker Foothills Chamber of Commerce


Point Roberts
Sun-drenched Point Roberts has always been a favorite destination for visitors. From the native Americans who came every summer for hundreds of years to B.C. families summering before the First World War - the history of Point Roberts would be incomplete without recognizing the impact of tourists. What attracted visitors then still weaves its spell today. Peace and quiet, forests, beaches, water and, above all, a friendly reception from the residents. Today, about 900 people call the Point their home year-round.

Point Roberts encompasses almost five square miles of peninsula and extends south from Canada. It is a small corner of the country cut off from the mainland by the 1846 Treaty of Washington which drew the interna­tional boundary between the U.S. and Canada at the 49th parallel. Point Roberts is separated from the rest of Whatcom County and Washington state by 23 driving miles through British Columbia. The community is about 30 minutes by car from Vancouver and a 10 minute drive from the Tsawwassen ferry dock linking the mainland to Vancouver Island - Victoria, B.C.

Parks include Lighthouse Marine Park, with fully-serviced campground, boat ramp, picnic sites and boardwalk. Orca whales sightings are common on the west side of the Point. Boating is central to the life of Point Roberts. The marine atmosphere colors much of the local activity at "The Point." A marina, yacht club and wide variety of marine services offer virtually everything a boater could need, including a head start to the San Juans, Gulf Islands, and some of the finest fishing, sailing and cruising in the Northwest.

In addition to the pleasures of the outdoors, there are restaurants, taverns, a new golf course, and a quaint bed and breakfast.

Information:
Point Roberts Chamber of Commerce


Sumas
Located on the U.S.- Canadian border, Sumas is a popular and busy crossing point between the two countries. The name Sumas means "land without trees" according to the Cowichan first nation inhabitants of British Columbia. The first non-Indian settlers homesteaded this area in the 1870s. Today there are plenty of trees in this community of around 1,000 people, and the picturesque Sumas river runs just east of town.

The town hosts a number of festivals each year. The signature event for the community is the Sumas Junior Rodeo, each Labor Day Weekend in September. Several hundred youths descend on the Rodeo Grounds to rope and ride in the fast-paced competition. Twice a year the same grounds are bustling with the Bull-A-Rama, a competition featuring top amateur adult bull riders from the United States and Canada.

Sumas visitor amenities include lodging, shopping, dining, campgrounds and professional services.

Information:


Lynda Hinton

Direct: (360) 303-1023
Office: (360) 734-7500
Fax: (360) 676-4694


Windermere Real Estate Whatcom :: 515 W. Bakerview Rd. :: Bellingham, WA 98226 :: Phone: (360) 734-7500 :: Fax: (360) 676-4694
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